Mom assumed her son's summer thirst was normal, but it was really a red flag - Net - Indir

Mom assumed her son’s summer thirst was normal, but it was really a red flag

Maddox, Courtney Moore’s 16-month-old son, began snatching her water bottle and drinking large gulps of water throughout the summer. Temperatures in Sacramento, California, had surpassed 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so she wasn’t shocked. She phoned their physician when he started soaking through his nighttime diapers and found that Maddox had an unexpected diagnosis: he had Type 1 diabetes and was in diabetic ketoacidosis.

“On the phone, the doctor stated, ‘His blood glucose was 684,'” Moore, a public relations professional, told TODAY Parents. “‘Well, he should be about 150,’ the doctor remarked. “Oh yes, that’s high!” I said.

Maddox was brought to the hospital, where he was treated. Moore wanted to share their experience to urge parents to get assistance if their children seem to be acting strangely.

“Trust your instincts,” she said. “Talk to a doctor if you think anything is wrong.” Talk to their doctor about it and simply get rid of it… I would have had peace of mind even if it had been nothing.”

When is thirst linked to diabetes in children?

Maddox appeared to gravitate for Moore’s water bottle as soon as he started mobility. She didn’t see anything wrong with it, but he seemed to be drinking a lot more than usual. She attributed it to the heat wave at first. She wondered if anything had changed when he started soaking through his diapers.

“I asked for advice on Facebook, and a couple of parents suggested we double up on the diapers,” Moore said. “We tried everything we could think of, every brand we could think of, and nothing worked.” He’d wake up saturated in his own urine. It was strewn throughout his cot. It was a complete disaster.”

Courtney and Jason Moore had no notion that Maddox’s increased thirst indicated anything other than that it was a hot day in Sacramento on July 4th. He was admitted to the hospital two days later with diabetic ketoacidosis caused by type 1 diabetes. (Photo credit: Courtney Moore)

Courtney and Jason Moore had no notion that Maddox’s increased thirst indicated anything other than that it was a hot day in Sacramento on July 4th. He was admitted to the hospital two days later with diabetic ketoacidosis caused by type 1 diabetes. (Photo credit: Courtney Moore)

She also saw that he reached for water as soon as he awoke. Moore looked online for remedies to Maddox’s soaked diapers, and one result kept popping up: Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which the pancreas fails to produce insulin.

“I was thinking, ‘I don’t know, it sounds a little excessive,'” she remembered. “I texted his doctor and said, ‘Here’s what’s up with Maddox, I’m a bit worried.'”

She decided to call after another night of soaking through his diaper, and she talked with a physician, who advised bloodwork.

“We received a couple of emergency calls from the hospital within an hour of the bloodwork saying, ‘You need to take Maddox to the ER,'” she recalled.

Maddox was suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially lethal consequence of uncontrolled diabetes.

“If your blood glucose levels continue to rise, folks may get confused.” They could faint. People in their immediate vicinity would realize that they were severely unwell. Dr. Gregory Deines, division head for diabetes and endocrinology at Spectrum Health in Grand Rapids, Michigan, who did not treat Maddox, told TODAY Parents that they may suffer stomach discomfort, nausea, and vomiting. “Worst-case possibilities include individuals going into a coma and becoming unresponsive. It’s incredibly hazardous if it occurs, and people might die.”

Doctors gave Maddox fluids to rehydrate him, according to Moore. Untreated diabetic patients consume more water, but they also pee more.

She added, “I thought it was unusual since you know he’s been drinking water; he’s had enough of fluids.” “However, his body wasn’t handling it well.”

After Courtney and Jason Moore’s son Maddox was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, doctors and nurses at Kaiser Roseville Hospital showed them how to monitor his blood glucose level and give him insulin. (Photo credit: Courtney Moore)

After Courtney and Jason Moore’s son Maddox was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, doctors and nurses at Kaiser Roseville Hospital showed them how to monitor his blood glucose level and give him insulin. (Photo credit: Courtney Moore)

The physicians then administered insulin to him.

She stated, “His blood sugars were so high that it may be harmful to him.” “The first thing they wanted to do was get him out of the diabetic ketoacidosis danger zone.”

Type 1 diabetics must take insulin for the rest of their lives. Moore was first concerned about what this might imply for her child.

“You never imagine it’ll be your child,” she said. “I was simply worried about him dealing with this in primary school and perhaps being teased.”

But she quickly changed her mind.

“I was like, ‘OK, I’ll just concentrate on one day at a time.’ She said, “Right now, I have a 16-month-old child who is beginning to feel better.” “He won’t be able to tell the difference.”

Type 1 diabetes symptoms

Thirst is a typical symptom of diabetes. However, it is often missed.

Deines said, “People might relate the symptoms to other things.” “(They’ll think) ‘It’s hotter outside, so I’m simply drinking extra fluids because I’m thirsty.’ “Well, I’m needing to urinate more often… because I’m drinking all this water,” they’ll think.

Other Type 1 diabetes symptoms include:

  • Energy depletion
  • Weight loss that is unexplained and unintentional.
  • Having a bad day

“They may come on quickly,” Deines said.

Courtney Moore recognized Maddox had lost weight in retrospect. But she assumed it was due to his high level of activity. Diabetes was not on her radar since no one in her family has it. (Photo credit: Courtney Moore)

Courtney Moore recognized Maddox had lost weight in retrospect. But she assumed it was due to his high level of activity. Diabetes was not on her radar since no one in her family has it. (Photo credit: Courtney Moore)

Moore said she realized Maddox was losing weight in retrospect but assumed it was because he was so active.

“He experienced a few other minor symptoms,” she said, “but nothing that was alarming.” “He’s a developing toddler… He’s slimming down a little bit now that he’s walking and running about,” I reasoned.

Raising diabetes awareness among children

Maddox has been laughing, smiling, and cheerful since his release from the hospital. Moore believes it is critical to encourage parents to trust their intuition when it comes to their children’s health.

“I’m simply worried about other parents who have kids with these exact same symptoms and say things like ‘It’s hot outside’ or ‘They’re going through a growth spurt,'” she said. “It seems that we might have pushed it off longer and it may have killed him.”

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